vSphere Performance – vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) monitoring

This post is a (late) follow-up on a previous post I did about exploring the monitoring endpoints of the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA), and an addition to the vSphere Performance blog series.

Now we will add performance metrics and health status of the VCSA to our monitoring solution. We’ll utilize the REST APIs in vCenter and feed the data into our Influx database and visualize it in Grafana.

In vCenter we have the Appliance Management page also refered to as the VAMI. We will use this as a blueprint of what we want to visualize, but we’ll try to fit the important parts into a single Grafana dashboard. ...  continue reading

vSphere Performance data – New vSphere plugin for Telegraf

Recently there was a new release of Telegraf, a monitoring agent from the guys that built InfluxDB. This new version, 1.8.0, comes with a plugin for vSphere which I’m pretty excited about!

Previously I’ve been testing Telegraf for monitoring some Linux VMs and also my InfluxDB servers and the agent works as expected and it’s as easy to use as the other products in the TICK stack from Influx.

If you’ve followed my blog series about building a monitoring solution for vSphere and other infrastructure components you know that I’ve pulled metrics with PowerCLI scripts. With this new plugin to Telegraf I want to see if I can use this as a replacement. ...  continue reading

Slides and scripts from VMUG sessions

I had the privilege of delivering 3 sessions at VMUG Norway this week in Oslo, Trondheim and Bergen.

With the extremely nice weather in Norway this week in mind the attendance were great and as always the discussions were valuable.

My session on vSphere Performance monitoring were the short version of the blog series I did about how we built our solution for doing performance monitoring of vSphere with InfluxDB and Grafana, and how we easily can customize with adding metrics and datasources. ...  continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Monitoring VMware vSAN performance

In my blog series on building a solution for monitoring vSphere Performance we have scripts for pulling VM and Host performance. I did some changes to those recently, mainly by adding some more metrics for instance for VDI hosts.

This post will be about how we included our VSAN environments to the performance monitoring. This has gotten a great deal easier after the Get-VSANStat cmdlet came along in recent versions of PowerCLI.

We will build with the same components as before, a PowerCLI script pulling data and pushing it to an InfluxDB time-series database and finally visualizing it in some Grafana dashboards. ...  continue reading

Chronograf dashboard

Exploring the TICK stack

For those of you that have read my blog you probably know I’ve done a series on performance monitoring infrastructure with the help of InfluxDB.

InfluxDB is a part of the TICK stack delivered by InfluxData. All components are open-sourced and available. The TICK stack consists of, Telegraf, InfluxDB, Chronograf and Kapacitor.

This post will do a quick review and some examples on how I have started exploring them in my Performance monitoring project. ...  continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Part 8 – Wrap-up and next steps

This is Part 8 and last part (I think…) of my series on vSphere Performance data.

Part 1 discusses the project, Part 2 is about exploring how to retrieve data, Part 3 is about using Get-Stat for the retrieval. Part 4 talked about the database used to store the retrieved data, InfluxDB. Part 5 showed how data is written to the database. Part 6 was about creating dashboards to show off the data. Part 7 added more data to the project. This part will try to wrap up and look at some future steps.

When I started my project I did it with a clear picture on how and what software I would use. Therefore I didn’t look around much for if and how others had done it. After a while I did find that (of course) several others have done similar projects with vSphere performance data, InfluxDB and Grafana. ...  continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Part 7 – More data

This is Part 7 of my series on vSphere Performance data.

Part 1 discusses the project, Part 2 is about exploring how to retrieve data, Part 3 is about using Get-Stat for the retrieval. Part 4 talked about the database used to store the retrieved data, InfluxDB. Part 5 showed how data is written to the database. Part 6 was about creating dashboards to show off the data. This post adds even more data to the project!

One thing I’ve learned by this project is that when you gather data you are always looking out for other data sources to add! Until now we’ve seen how we have retrieved metrics from all VMs in our environment on 20 second intervals. But what about the ESXi hosts running those VMs? And what about the Storage arrays they use? ...  continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Part 6 – The Dashboard(s)

This is Part 6 of my series on vSphere Performance data.

Part 1 discusses the project, Part 2 is about exploring how to retrieve data, Part 3 is about using Get-Stat for the retrieval. Part 4 talked about the database used to store the retrieved data, InfluxDB. Part 5 showed how data is written to the database. This post will show some results of our work!

As I talked about in Part 1 I had decided to go with Grafana as the front-end. Grafana is an open source software for time series analytics which can make use of several datasources, making it the perfect match for the data in my InfluxDB. ...  continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Part 5 – The script

This is Part 5 of my series on vSphere Performance data.

Part 1 discusses the project, Part 2 is about exploring how to retrieve data, Part 3 is about using Get-Stat for the retrieval. Part 4 talked about the database used to store the retrieved data, InfluxDB. This one will do some actual work and will retrieve data from vCenter and write it to the database.

The last post showed how to write some data to the performance database InfluxDB through its API. As Powershell is good at interacting with APIs this is what I will use for writing the data. ...  continue reading