Slides and script from VMUG session in December

I had the pleasure of giving a talk about how to do monitoring of the vCenter Server during the VMUG Oslo meeting in December. The session was an extension of what I presented during the VMUG meetings in May and the vBrownbag session during VMworld Europe.

The demos showed how we can get health status and metrics from a vCenter Server Appliance utilizing the new REST APIs shipped in 6.5 and 6.7. During the session I built out a Grafana dashboard with version and uptime information about the vCenter, the health status, vCenter service status, disk utilization and CPU/Memory utilization.

Detailed information about how I’ve built out these dashboards can be found here...  continue reading

Exploring the HPE G2 PDU REST API

Lately I’ve been playing around with the Redfish based REST API in the HPE G2 Metered and Switched Power Distribution Units.

Through the API you are able to pull some details about the PDU as well as different utilization data. Based on your PDUs capabilities you should also be able to control different outlets. My focus has been to pull some details about the PDUs, and to pull the load on the different segments.

As I usually do when I set out exploring an API I was looking for the documentation. Surprisingly there was nothing to be found. The only thing I found was a few lines in the PDU User guide regarding authentication. ...  continue reading

Exploring monitoring endpoints in the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) REST API

For a long time, actually since we migrated to the VCSA in 6.5 last year, I’ve wanted to utilize the REST API in the appliance to have some monitoring of them.

For several reasons I’ve had to put that on hold, one of them being that there seems to be something wrong with the back-end authentication calls. I get authentication errors on certain calls no matter which user I am logged in with (also the vsphere.local admin account).

 ...  continue reading

Creating a Powershell module as an API wrapper

We all love today’s modern web with lots of API’s available, both for retrieving information from various sources, gaining additional insights and for transform and enrich your data. Most API’s today are RESTFUL, meaning that they should follow the REST principles. REST is not a standard, it’s more a guideline for how to design your API.

With the REST guidelines in place many API’s share the same or similar structure and with that it gets easier to work with API’s as you can make use of the same techniques. If you’re familiar with Windows Powershell this is one of the easiest ways of exploring an API.

This was also the reason why my good colleague Martin Ehrnst and I decided to do a talk on using Powershell and API’s on the Nordic Infrastructure Conference (NIC) in Oslo this year. The slides and demos from that session, Invoke-{your}RestMethod will available here¬†shortly. ...  continue reading