Upgrading to HPE OneView 4.1 – Failed!

After the release of the new and shiny version 4.1 of HPE OneView we have tried to upgrade one of our (smaller) OneView instances.

The update process is usually quite straight forward and it gets better in every release. The upgrade to 4.0 from 3.x had some issues with certificate handling post-upgrade, but it was manageable.

The upgrade from 4.0 to 4.1 should not be affected by the same so I had great hopes about a smooth upgrade.

After reading up on the Release notes and Install/upgrade instructions we proceeded with the upgrade process. We are upgrading from 4.0.07.

First of is to do a backup of the appliance.… continue reading

Automating disk limits in vSphere

Following up on my last post on Limiting disk i/o in vSphere we will now see how to automate this.

First off we need some way to identify what limit a specific disk should have.

You can do this in multiple ways, you could use an external source, you can use Tags or as we’ve done, Storage Policies.

All our VMs and VMDKs have a Storage Policy to control the Storage it will be compliant with. We have named our policies so we can identify what kind of limit it should have.
We can now use this to set the limit corresponding to the policy.… continue reading

Release of HPE OneView 4.1

Recently HPE released version 4.1 of their management platform, OneView.

We use OneView extensively in our environment and are always looking out for new functionality and features in the product.

Version 4.1 comes with some new promising features.

  • Secure remote troubleshooting with Remote Technician
  • Reduced downtime for firmware and driver updates for HPE ProLiant servers
  • Simplified cluster management and rolling updates

Especially the ability to schedule firmware upgrades and rolling updates on a vSphere cluster sounds exiting and are very welcome. I have hoped and asked for scheduling of firmware directly in OneView for a long time without the need for external componens like the Smart Update Tools (SUT) VM.… continue reading

Working with disk limits in PowerCLI

This will be a post following on the previous one on how to control disk i/o in vSphere

That post showed how you set IOPS limits either through the UI or with PowerCLI.

Even though you set the limit on individual disks you need to work through the VM. And when you retrieve the disk limits for a VM you’ll get back limits on disks identified by the device key and not the label.

To make this a bit easier to work with I’ve created some Powershell functions that wraps the *-VMResourceConfiguration cmdlets and one that gives you the label of the disks when you query the limits for a VM.… continue reading

Limiting disk i/o in vSphere

As a Service provider we need to have some way of limiting individual VMs from utilizing too much of our shared resources.

When it comes to CPU and Memory this is rarely an issue as we try to not over-committing these resources, at least not the Memory. For CPU we closely monitor counters like CPU Ready and Latency to ensure that our VMs will have access to the resources they need.

For storage this can be more difficult. Where we usually have 50-60 VMs on a host we will probably have hundreds on a Storage Array (SAN). Of course the SAN should be spec’ed to handle the IOPS and Throughput you need, but you also need to balance the amount of disk space available and maybe most importantly, the cost.… continue reading

Customizing ESXi installation with kickstart files and PXE boot

This blog post will be building on a previous post where I built a small PXE server environment for ESXi installation.

In this post we will enhance the PXE install with customized kickstart files specific for the hardware we want to install.

There’s two new components to discuss here. The kickstart file (ks.cfg) it self and how to point to it during PXE boot.

Let’s take a look at the current environment

The tftp server root is located at /var/lib/tftpboot and my images is stored as directories under this directory. The default (and at this point only) PXE menu is configured in the pxelinux.cfg/default file (used in legacy PXE boot)

Kickstart scripts

We’ll start customizing with adding a generic kickstart file under a new ks directory.… continue reading

Slides and scripts from VMUG sessions

I had the privilege of delivering 3 sessions at VMUG Norway this week in Oslo, Trondheim and Bergen.

With the extremely nice weather in Norway this week in mind the attendance were great and as always the discussions were valuable.

My session on vSphere Performance monitoring were the short version of the blog series I did about how we built our solution for doing performance monitoring of vSphere with InfluxDB and Grafana, and how we easily can customize with adding metrics and datasources.

The main goal of my session was to demonstrate how easy it is to get started with a project like this and get som actual value.… continue reading

Speaking at VMUG Norway

I’ll be speaking at VMUG Norway’s meetings this May.

As always there will be “three sessions in three cities”.

  • Oslo, May 29th
  • Trondheim, May 30th
  • Bergen, May 31st

The topic for my session will be how we have built our own vSphere Performance monitoring solution which I’ve also done a blog series about.

The VMUG meetings are free, for more information check out https://www.vmug.com/norway. I hope you’re able to join!… continue reading

Grafana dashboard

Monitoring FreeNAS with InfluxDB and Grafana

At work I have done some monitoring projects which I’ve done many blog posts about. At home I have a small vSphere environment serving partially as a Lab but it also runs some services we use at home. Of course I do monitoring of this environment as well, and I use both InfluxDB and Grafana as we do at work.

One of my VMs runs Plex Media Server and recently I moved my media library to a separate box running FreeNAS. I’ve used FreeNAS as a part of my lab earlier as an ISCSI target and serving storage for VMs, but it’s now only serving my media files to the Plex VM.… continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Monitoring VMware vSAN performance

In my blog series on building a solution for monitoring vSphere Performance we have scripts for pulling VM and Host performance. I did some changes to those recently, mainly by adding some more metrics for instance for VDI hosts.

This post will be about how we included our VSAN environments to the performance monitoring. This has gotten a great deal easier after the Get-VSANStat cmdlet came along in recent versions of PowerCLI.

We will build with the same components as before, a PowerCLI script pulling data and pushing it to an InfluxDB time-series database and finally visualizing it in some Grafana dashboards.… continue reading