HPE PDU Powershell module

As a follow-up of my exploration of the HPE PDU REST API I wanted to create a Powershell module as a wrapper for the API.

I’ve previously written a post on how to create a Powershell module as a wrapper for an API here. The PDU module will be built in the same way where there will be a private function that handles the actual API requests.

This time I also wanted to go a bit further and split out the functions into individual script files that the module root file will load.
With individual files the maintenance of the functions as well as the split between private and public functions would be easier.… continue reading

Automating two-node vSAN cluster setup

In a previous post I described how we are setting up remote offices for a customer with two-node vSAN clusters. I meant to get this post out right after that previous one, but things happened… Anyways, here’s how we automated those two-node vSAN clusters.

Currently we have 7 of these racks ready with more to come. As these will be installed at distant locations we are extra keen on knowing that they are all configured as they should, and that the configuration is the same cross these multiple locations.

Of course, this calls for automation. And with our favorite automation tool PowerCLI we have put together a script to do the vSAN configuration for us.… continue reading

Automate disabling of IPMI over LAN access on HPE iLO

This article will describe how you can disable the IPMI over LAN access on HPE iLO.

The IPMI protocol can present a security vulnerability where the authentication process for IPMI requires a server to send a hash of a user password to the client before authentication. This is not a new vulnerability and since this is a part of the specification of the protocol there is no fix for it besides disabling it or accepting it.

Note that iLO versions 2, 3 and 4 have the IPMI over LAN access enabled by default whereas iLO version 5 has disabled this by default.… continue reading

Exploring monitoring endpoints in the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) REST API

For a long time, actually since we migrated to the VCSA in 6.5 last year, I’ve wanted to utilize the REST API in the appliance to have some monitoring of them.

For several reasons I’ve had to put that on hold, one of them being that there seems to be something wrong with the back-end authentication calls. I get authentication errors on certain calls no matter which user I am logged in with (also the vsphere.local admin account).

 

After deciding to check it more closely I eventually found a few errors in the VCSA logs which in turn led me to this article by Ryan Harris.… continue reading

Automating disk limits in vSphere

Following up on my last post on Limiting disk i/o in vSphere we will now see how to automate this.

First off we need some way to identify what limit a specific disk should have.

You can do this in multiple ways, you could use an external source, you can use Tags or as we’ve done, Storage Policies.

All our VMs and VMDKs have a Storage Policy to control the Storage it will be compliant with. We have named our policies so we can identify what kind of limit it should have.
We can now use this to set the limit corresponding to the policy.… continue reading

Working with disk limits in PowerCLI

This will be a post following on the previous one on how to control disk i/o in vSphere

That post showed how you set IOPS limits either through the UI or with PowerCLI.

Even though you set the limit on individual disks you need to work through the VM. And when you retrieve the disk limits for a VM you’ll get back limits on disks identified by the device key and not the label.

To make this a bit easier to work with I’ve created some Powershell functions that wraps the *-VMResourceConfiguration cmdlets and one that gives you the label of the disks when you query the limits for a VM.… continue reading

Limiting disk i/o in vSphere

As a Service provider we need to have some way of limiting individual VMs from utilizing too much of our shared resources.

When it comes to CPU and Memory this is rarely an issue as we try to not over-committing these resources, at least not the Memory. For CPU we closely monitor counters like CPU Ready and Latency to ensure that our VMs will have access to the resources they need.

For storage this can be more difficult. Where we usually have 50-60 VMs on a host we will probably have hundreds on a Storage Array (SAN). Of course the SAN should be spec’ed to handle the IOPS and Throughput you need, but you also need to balance the amount of disk space available and maybe most importantly, the cost.… continue reading

Slides and scripts from VMUG sessions

I had the privilege of delivering 3 sessions at VMUG Norway this week in Oslo, Trondheim and Bergen.

With the extremely nice weather in Norway this week in mind the attendance were great and as always the discussions were valuable.

My session on vSphere Performance monitoring were the short version of the blog series I did about how we built our solution for doing performance monitoring of vSphere with InfluxDB and Grafana, and how we easily can customize with adding metrics and datasources.

The main goal of my session was to demonstrate how easy it is to get started with a project like this and get som actual value.… continue reading

vSphere Performance data – Monitoring VMware vSAN performance

In my blog series on building a solution for monitoring vSphere Performance we have scripts for pulling VM and Host performance. I did some changes to those recently, mainly by adding some more metrics for instance for VDI hosts.

This post will be about how we included our VSAN environments to the performance monitoring. This has gotten a great deal easier after the Get-VSANStat cmdlet came along in recent versions of PowerCLI.

We will build with the same components as before, a PowerCLI script pulling data and pushing it to an InfluxDB time-series database and finally visualizing it in some Grafana dashboards.… continue reading

Automating iLO config and OneView setup for HPE servers

We have quite a few Blade Enclosures with BL460c server blades in them and have been happy with those. For managing these we are primarly using HPE OneView and in some cases the Onboard Administrator (OA).

Our latest batch of new hardware however was DL360 and DL380 rack servers. These will also be managed by OneView primarly, but initially we need to do some iLO config on each server which in the case of blades are done by the OA. They will also have to be added to OneView manually while the blades would be brought in automatically from the chassis.… continue reading